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National Insect Week returns in 2020

HIGH RES IMAGES AND LOGOS

Captions and credits are included beneath each image. Shorter form captions can be used (in order):

1) NIW logo (copyright RES but caption and credit does not need to be shown)

2) Sawflies eating a birch leaf © Anthony Cooper

3) Hairy-footed flower bee looking through the keyhole © Anthony Cooper

4) Male common blue damselfly © Darron Matthews

5) Ant and wasp ‘the kiss’ © Pawel Bieniewski

6) Aduly mayfly at sunset © Danny Beath

7) Red Admiral © Jenny Bailey

1)

NIW logo (copyright RES but information does not need to be shown)

2)

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Sawflies eating a birch leaf

Caption

Sawflies eating a birch leaf, Second Prize 2014 NIW Photography Competition Insects Alive category

Credit

© Dr Anthony Cooper

3)

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Hairy-footed flower bee, Anthophora plumipes, looking through the keyhole

Caption

Hairy-footed flower bee, Anthophora plumipes, looking through the keyhole, First Prize 2012 Photography Competition adult category

Credit

© Anthony Cooper

4)

2012_322h.jpg

Male common blue damselfly, Enallagma cyathigerum

Caption

Male common blue damselfly, Enallagma cyathigerum, Specially Commended 2012 NIW Insect Photography Competition adult category

Credit

© Darron Matthews

5)

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Ant Formica sp. & wasp Vespula sp.

Caption

Ant Formica sp. & wasp Vespula sp, Specially Commended 2010 NIW Photography Competition adult category

Credit

© Pawel Bieniewski

6)

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Adult mayfly at sunset

Caption

Adult mayfly at sunset, First Prize 2010 NIW Photography Competition riverfly category

Credit

© Danny Beath

7)

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Red Admiral butterfly, Vanessa atalanta, on Mahonia

Caption

Red Admiral butterfly, Vanessa atalanta, on Mahonia, Commended 2012 NIW Photography Competition adult category

Credit

© Jenny Bailey

Did you know?

Sexiest

Female water snipe flies Atherix ibis clasp each other and cluster in big round aggregations on the end of branches overhanging rivers – males entering the swarms are mated repeatedly until they die. The females then lay their eggs in to the water – and all die still in their tight aggregations.